Meier Corroboration #192

 

Oct 11, 2015

https://billymeier.wordpress.com/2019/07/02/the-truth-about-neonicotinoids/

Ptaah:
42. Then here’s what I want to say about neonicotinoids:
43. These are mainly used as seed dressings and for foliar and soil treatment, where they correspond to a group of highly effective insecticides, which all correspond to synthetically produced toxic substances and are fatal to all living beings depending on the amount, including humans.

44. The best known three neonicotinoids are called clothianidin, imidacloprid and thiamethoxam.

…read the full excerpt…

Sept 12, 2019

https://phys.org/news/2019-09-controversial-insecticides-shown-threaten-survival.html

Controversial insecticides shown to threaten survival of wild birds

New research at the University of Saskatchewan (USask) shows how the world’s most widely used insecticides could be partly responsible for a dramatic decline in songbird populations.

A study published in the journal Science on Sept. 13 is the first experiment to track the effects of a neonicotinoid pesticide on birds in the wild.

The study found that white-crowned sparrows who consumed small doses of an insecticide called imidacloprid suffered weight loss and delays to their migration—effects that could severely harm the birds’ chances of surviving and reproducing.

“We saw these effects using doses well within the range of what a bird could realistically consume in the wild—equivalent to eating just a few treated seeds,” said Margaret Eng, a post-doctoral fellow in the USask Toxicology Centre and lead author on the study.

Although the toxic effects of neonicotinoids were once thought to affect only insects, most notably pollinators such as bees, there is growing evidence that birds are routinely exposed to the pesticides with significant negative consequences.

Our study shows that this is bigger than the bees—birds can also be harmed by modern neonicotinoid pesticides which should worry us all,” said Stutchbury.

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