Archive for the ‘Health’ Category

More PROVEN human destruction of nature

March 13, 2018

Poaching and habitat loss have reduced forest elephant populations in Central Africa by 63 percent since 2001.

This widespread killing poses dire consequences not only for the species itself but also for the region’s forests, a new Duke University study finds.

“Without intervention to stop poaching, as much as 96 percent of Central Africa’s forests will undergo major changes in tree-species composition and structure as local populations of are extirpated and surviving populations are crowded into ever-smaller remnants,” said John Poulsen, assistant professor of tropical ecology at Duke’s Nicholas School of the Environment.

Read more at:

Cattle ranching, agriculture and other human activities are breaking up Costa Rican forests into isolated patchy fragments, but causing more problems for native plant populations than for monkey species sharing the same habitat.

A study published in the journal Primates shows that while plants growing near the edges of cleared regions are negatively impacted by human activity, sharing the same habitat do not fare as poorly.

Read more at:

Human encroachment is the leading cause of death among Ontario’s at-risk birds of prey, according to a first-ever University of Guelph study.

“The most common cause of was from trauma, which often included colliding with a vehicle or flying into stationary objects, such as buildings,” said Nemeth. “The second most common cause was emaciation, which often occurs when the landscape changes in a way that hinders them from successfully hunting and finding shelter.”

This was the first study to examine the most common causes of death in raptors in Ontario.

Read more at:


Damn Dams risk fish extinction in U.S.

February 9, 2018

Dams drive local extinction risk of native fish in the southern United States, according to a study by Florida International University.

The high number of dams built close to each other in the southeast significantly limits where fish can move throughout their lives, driving the risk of extinction for native fish in some areas, according to a study led by FIU ecologist John Kominoski. In the southwest, dams and climate change interact to drive the risk of native fish extinction in some areas. …The restriction of water flows in rivers and streams is proving to be a real problem for fish.

The southern U.S. has experienced unprecedented population growth driving up water demands.

Read more at:

See also:



Salmon and Orcas sick of Man Made Pesticides

January 13, 2018

US review shows pesticides harm threatened salmon, whales

Federal scientists have determined that a family of widely used pesticides poses a threat to dozens of endangered and threatened species, including Pacific salmon, Atlantic sturgeon and Puget Sound orcas.

The National Marine Fisheries Service issued its new biological opinion on three organophosphate pesticides—chlorpyrifos, diazinon and malathion—after a yearslong court fight by environmental groups. At the urging of pesticide manufacturers, the Trump administration had sought a two-year delay of a court-ordered deadline to issue the findings by the end of 2017, but it was unsuccessful.

The exhaustive 3,700-page federal review , dated Dec. 29, concludes that chlorpyrifos and malathion jeopardize 38 out of the 77 species under the jurisdiction of the fisheries service and that diazinon was found to jeopardize 25 of the listed species.

Organophosphorus gas was originally developed as a chemical weapon before World War II. Dow Chemical, based in Midland, Michigan, has been selling chlorpyrifos for spraying on citrus fruits, apples, cherries and other crops since the 1960s. It is among the most widely used agricultural pesticides in the United States, with Dow selling about 5 million pounds (2.3 million kilograms) domestically each year.

Studies have shown for years that even low levels of pesticides running off into streams and rivers can impair the growth, swimming ability and reproductive systems of salmon. Potentially harmful levels of the toxins then build up in the bodies of orcas, also known as killer whales, that eat salmon.

orca salmon

“Salmon have been waiting four decades for relief from toxic pesticides in many of our rivers,” said Glen Spain, the northwest regional director of the Pacific Coast Federation of Fishermen’s Associations. “The agencies should do their job.”

Read more at:


Areas of No Oxygen in Ocean Waters

January 5, 2018

In the past 50 years, the amount of water in the open ocean with zero oxygen has gone up more than fourfold. In coastal water bodies, including estuaries and seas, low-oxygen sites have increased more than 10-fold since 1950. Scientists expect oxygen to continue dropping even outside these zones as Earth warms.

“Oxygen is fundamental to life in the oceans,” said Denise Breitburg, lead author and marine ecologist with the Smithsonian Environmental Research Center. “The decline in ocean oxygen ranks among the most serious effects of human activities on the Earth’s environment.”

Read more at:

See also:

See also:


Food Domes or Smaller Families?

December 16, 2017

point counterpoint3

see also




Daimler delivers its first all-electric trucks in Europe

December 15, 2017

“With the Fuso eCanter our customers now operate not only quietly and without locally emitted CO2, they also save money on operating costs,” said Marc Llistosella, head of Daimler Trucks Asia.

“This is the future of urban distribution transport.”

With a load-bearing capacity of 4.5 tons, the eCanter is equipped with six batteries and has a range of 100 kilometres (62 miles), the Mercedes Benz parent company said.


Package-shipping giant UPS has put eCanter trucks on the road in the United States, while in Japan convenience-store chain Seven-Eleven and Yamato Transport will each operate 25 of the trucks, according to Daimler.

Large-scale production of the fully electric, zero-emissions truck is set to begin in 2019.

Daimler’s announcement comes as carmakers and tech firms around the world jostle for dominance in the rush to meet a growing demand for clean, quiet delivery trucks as cities grapple with smog and noise pollution.

Read more at:


Mysterious Tweet- Can you decode it?

November 28, 2017


— GalacticIntel(@GalacticIntel) November 28, 2017


Updated: Prince William – Overpopulation…the biggest challenge

November 3, 2017

11.13.17:  15,000 scientists now agree with Billy Meier’s warnings:

“By failing to adequately limit population growth, reassess the role of an economy rooted in growth, reduce greenhouse gases, incentivise renewable energy, protect habitat, restore ecosystems, curb pollution, halt defaunation, and constrain invasive alien species, humanity is not taking the urgent steps needed to safeguard our imperilled biosphere.”

“We are jeopardising our future by not reining in our intense but geographically and demographically uneven material consumption and by not perceiving continued rapid population growth as a primary driver behind many ecological and even societal threats.”


Rapidly growing human populations [now 8.8 BILLLION] risk having a “terrible impact” on the world, the Duke of Cambridge has warned.

The Duke said that as a result, wildlife was being put under “enormous pressure” and called for the issue to be addressed with renewed vigour.

His concerns echo those of his grandfather, the Duke of Edinburgh, who in 2011 advocated

“voluntary family limitation” as a means of solving overpopulation,

which he described as the biggest challenge in conservation.

His grandson, royal patron of the Tusk Trust, told the charity’s gala dinner in London that measures needed to be taken to save certain animal populations.

“In my lifetime, we have seen global wildlife populations decline by over half,” he said.


Big Eco News Headlines September 2017

September 10, 2017

Unprecedented levels of nitrogen pose risks to Earth’s environment

Human production of this is now five times higher than it was 60 years ago. This increase could pose as much of a danger to Earth’s environment as the rapid increase in climate-warming atmospheric carbon dioxide, the scientists say.

Read more at:

China looks at ending sales of gasoline cars

China is joining France and Britain in announcing plans to end sales of gasoline and diesel cars.

China’s industry ministry is developing a timetable to end production and sale of traditional fuel cars and will promote development of electric technology, state media on Sunday cited a Cabinet official as saying.

Read more at:

Heat stress escalates in cities under global warming

Heatwaves are intensifying in cities due to the double whammy of the urban heat island effect and global warming, according to a new study.

The study’s authors used computer models to simulate with unprecedented detail the changes through the mid-21st century in Belgian cities. They found that heatwaves become hotter, longer and more frequent because of , and that temperature above the stress alarm level increases by a factor of between 1.4 and 15 by the middle of this century.

Read more at:

Ship exhaust makes oceanic thunderstorms more intense

Thunderstorms directly above two of the world’s busiest shipping lanes are significantly more powerful than storms in areas of the ocean where ships don’t travel, according to new research.

A new study mapping lightning around the globe finds occur nearly twice as often directly above heavily-trafficked shipping lanes in the Indian Ocean and the South China Sea than they do in areas of the adjacent to that have similar climates.

The difference in lightning activity can’t be explained by changes in the weather, according to the study’s authors, who conclude that aerosol particles emitted in ship exhaust are changing how storm form over the ocean.

Read more at:

So what is the cause of all of this?  Humans!

Get the conclusive and comprehensive report here:


UK wind electricity cheaper than nuclear

The price of electricity from offshore wind in Britain has dipped below the level guaranteed to Hinkley Point, raising questions about the construction of the vast nuclear power station.   The price of offshore wind has fallen far below that of nuclear…

Read more at:



Hot Debate Around UFOs and Climate

July 19, 2017

As Things Heat Up, Michael Horn incinerates the latest member of the “Debunker of the Month” club, and physics dot org publishes “Manmade aerosols identified as driver in shifting global rainfall patterns” article…. and

“Removing CO2 from the air required to safeguard children’s future”


and I really cannot stress enough the part which points out that it is,

“required to safeguard children’s future”

Need to cool off? Perhaps you will take a cool and refreshing drink from the Goblet of the Truth, worth every petro dollar they are asking for it…and then some.

Or you can download the digital version of GOTT by the GOTT at no cost here:

Whether the temperatures are rising or falling, no credible person can deny the human caused destruction of the environment on the land, in the air, seas, and near space.