Posts Tagged ‘galaxy’

wandering black holes reported in 1988

October 13, 2016

  October 11, 2016  |   |    10 Comments

UFO contactee specifically described wandering Black Holes in 1988

What was formerly strictly theoretical* scientific conjecture, has now apparently been confirmed by a “new discovery” that astronomers have made pertaining to “wandering” black holes.

Despite NASA’s absolute certainty that black holes don’t wander, once again they are correcting their information to accord with what Billy Meier was told by the Plejaren extraterrestrial human beings who have been meeting with, and advising him, for almost 75 years.

While the skeptics and “scientific experts” now will stumble all over themselves to offer excuses, rationalizations, parsing, denials, etc. – rather than ever acknowledge the authenticity of Meier’s still ongoing  contacts – you can read the information verifiably published by Meier decades prior to the new report and additional corroborated information about black holes (emphasis added):

Official Contact Report 223, Sunday, May 1, 1988

Billy: …And since we’re already at it, I would like to come to speak again on the black hole of our Milky Way, of which we spoke – if I remember correctly – on the 30th of May, 1987. By its attractive force, we don’t simply fly with our SOL system uncontrollably out into space but rather are somehow still held within the Milky Way. There are, indeed, black holes in every galaxy, as you explained, which Semjase and Ptaah already said, but in addition to these, there are still the “black wanderers,” as you call those kinds of black holes that drift through the cosmos. Ptaah also said that in this regard, there would be two types, precisely the black holes that drift wildly through the Universe and then the others that are galaxy-bound and, thus, draw a certain course in or through a galaxy and its surroundings… I would now like to ask if also with or in our galaxy, such a “wandering black hole” exists, a “galaxy-wandering black hole,” so to speak, if I may name this thing in such a way?

Quetzal: …Yes, there actually is such a “black wanderer” or “wandering black hole” in the realm of your galaxy. Nevertheless, it is a smaller structure than what the actual central black hole of the Milky Way is. But still, it is very remarkable and draws an extensive course through the galaxy, and to be sure, at around 6,400 light years of distance from the actual center of the Milky Way. In addition to this “black wanderer,” there are still some other wandering black holes in the nearer and further surroundings of the galaxy.

Continue Reading…

Advertisements

Interstellar movie has nothing on this: Animated flight through our local Universe

October 14, 2014

Related: http://billymeier.wordpress.com/2014/09/15/number-of-human-races-in-our-universe-2/

Related: https://billymeier.wordpress.com/2015/01/12/18-humanoid-lifeforms-in-the-known-universe/

#WANA

Alien planet count passes 1,000 mark

January 1, 2014

Our galaxy likely harbors at least 160 billion alien worlds.

Mike Wall, SPACE.com Senior Writer         Space.com

planetes

C. Pulliam & D. Aguilar (CfA)
This artist’s illustration represents the variety of planets being detected by NASA’s Kepler spacecraft.
Scientists now say that one in six stars hosts an Earth-size planet.

Just two decades after first spotting planets orbiting a star other than our own sun, astronomers have notched a big milestone — the 1,000th alien planet.

Two of the five main databases that catalog exoplanet discoveries list 1,010 confirmed alien worlds as of today (Oct. 23, 2013). That’s a lot of progress since 1992, when researchers found the first-ever exoplanets orbiting a spinning neutron star, or pulsar.

“The discovery of many worlds around other stars is a great achievement of science and technology. The work of scientists and engineers from many countries were necessary to achieve this difficult milestone,” Abel Mendez Torres, of the University of Puerto Rico at Arecibo’s Planetary Habitability Laboratory, said in a statement Tuesday (Oct. 22). [The Strangest Alien Planets (Gallery)]

“However, 1,000 exoplanets in two decades is still a small fraction of those expected from the billions of stars in our galaxy,” he added. “The next big goal is to better understand their properties, while detecting many new ones.”

Indeed, the current tally is likely just the tip of the exoplanet iceberg. For example, a study published last year estimated that every star in the Milky Way hosts 1.6 planets on average — meaning that our galaxy likely harbors at least 160 billion alien worlds.

And those are just the planets with obvious parent stars. Another recent study calculated that “rogue planets” — those that cruise through space apparently unbound to any star — may outnumber “normal” worlds by 50 percent or so.

The number of confirmed planets should continue its dramatic upward swing in the near future as astronomers continue to hone their techniques and analyze data collected by instruments on the ground and in space.

The most prolific of these instruments is NASA’s Kepler spacecraft, whose planet-hunting mission came to an end this past May after four years when the second of its four orientation-maintaining reaction wheels failed. Kepler has flagged nearly 3,600 planet candidates to date.   Just 156 of them have been confirmed so far, but mission scientists expect at least 90 percent will end up being the real deal.

The five main exoplanet-discovery databases, and their current tallies, are: the Extrasolar Planets Encyclopedia (1,010); the Exoplanets Catalog, run by the Planetary Habitability Laboratory (1,010); the NASA Exoplanet Archive (919); the Exoplanet Orbit Database (755); and the Open Exoplanet Catalog (948).

The different numbers reported by the databases reflect the uncertainties inherent in exoplanet detection and confirmation.

Follow Mike Wall on Twitter @michaeldwall and Google+. Follow us @SpacedotcomFacebook or Google+. Originally published on SPACE.com.

Oct. 24, 2013 at 2:22 PM ET

 

Citizens Hearing on Disclosure DVD documentary needs crowdfunding support

June 25, 2013

Go to http://citizenshearing.org/ to get involved.