Posts Tagged ‘ocean’

Meier Corroboration #186

March 26, 2019

March 20th, 2019

ocean current slowing

https://blogs.ei.columbia.edu/2019/03/20/amoc-ocean-conveyor-belt-climate-change/

ocean current slowing 2

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September 1st, 2012

Billy:
But the over-population causes damage, and indeed increasingly, because it is growing ceaselessly and through that, with all the trappings of terrible things which are created from it, ever more natural disasters appear. In this regard, you told me privately recently that, by means of the climate change caused by humanity, the world’s oceans heat up quite enormously and thereby the so-called global conveyor belt, which drives the water through all the world’s oceans, could break down.
Ptaah:
That is right, because if the global conveyor belt – which, as the enormous current, runs through the oceans and constantly mixes their water – breaks down, then the movement of the oceans will cease, which then means that the majority of all life on Earth will be extinguished. At the present time it is already very bad, because the oceans have warmed to an alarming degree, and indeed in the last 17.9 years, with a thermal energy which must be computed as the equivalent of two (2) billion Hiroshima atom bombs. Through the fault of the Earth humanity, the Earth is now already in the midst of this destructive process, whereby the oceans, and the global conveyor belt, increasingly heat up increasingly dangerously.

http://www.futureofmankind.co.uk/Billy_Meier/Contact_Report_544

See also: https://gregdougall.wordpress.com/2018/06/03/through-the-fault-of-humans/

“watch the water”

Are Pacific Garbage Patches Natural or Man Made?

January 22, 2019

What do you call something that isn’t climate change or global warming?

Destruction Of The Environment As The Consequence Of Overpopulation.

pacific garbage patches b6a652169

Plankton decline in Atlantic Ocean

December 27, 2018

Pierre Pepin, a senior researcher with the Department of Fisheries and Oceans in St. John’s, says over the past three to four years, scientists have seen a persistent drop in phytoplankton and zooplankton in waters off Newfoundland and Labrador.

“Based on the measurements that we’ve been taking in this region, we’ve seen pretty close to 50 per cent decline in the overall biomass of zooplankton,” said Pepin. “So that’s pretty dramatic.”

Measuring five millimetres or less, phytoplankton contain chlorophyll to capture sunlight and use photosynthesis to turn it into chemical energy, which is later eaten by ocean creatures. (Photo courtesy of DFO)

Scientists say local testing reveals half the amount of plankton in a square metre of water today. It’s not just a problem here, declining plankton numbers are a global phenomenon.

It’s a difficult idea to convey to the average person who might not understand the ocean ecosystem, but Pepin likens it to walking into a grocery store and instead of seeing the shelves full, they’re only half-full.

Full article:

https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/newfoundland-labrador/ocean-phytoplankton-zooplankton-food-web-1.4927884

Thanks to: Joseph Borg

 

Through The Fault of Humans

June 3, 2018

Whale dies in Thailand after swallowing 80 plastic bags

BANGKOK (AFP) – 

A whale has died in southern Thailand after swallowing more than 80 plastic bags, officials said, ending an attempted rescue that failed to nurse the mammal back to health.

Thailand is one of the world’s largest consumers of plastic bags, which kill hundreds of marine creatures living near the country’s popular beaches each year.

The small male pilot whale became the latest victim after it was found barely alive in a canal near the border with Malaysia, the Department of Marine and Coastal Resources said on their Facebook page Saturday.

A veterinary team tried “to help stabilise its illness but finally the whale died” on Friday afternoon, the post said.

An autopsy revealed 80 plastic bags weighing up to eight kilograms (18 pounds) in the creature’s stomach, the department added.

Photos accompanying the post showed a group of people using buoys to keep the whale afloat after it was first spotted on Monday and an umbrella to shield it from the scorching sun.

The whale vomited up five bags during the rescue attempt before it died, the department said.

http://www.france24.com/en/20180602-whale-dies-thailand-after-swallowing-80-plastic-bags

See also:

https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2018/jun/05/the-planet-is-on-edge-of-a-global-plastic-calamity

See also:

https://gregdougall.wordpress.com/2018/01/13/salmon-and-orcas-sick-of-man-made-pesticides/

#DOTEATCOO

Areas of No Oxygen in Ocean Waters

January 5, 2018

In the past 50 years, the amount of water in the open ocean with zero oxygen has gone up more than fourfold. In coastal water bodies, including estuaries and seas, low-oxygen sites have increased more than 10-fold since 1950. Scientists expect oxygen to continue dropping even outside these zones as Earth warms.

“Oxygen is fundamental to life in the oceans,” said Denise Breitburg, lead author and marine ecologist with the Smithsonian Environmental Research Center. “The decline in ocean oxygen ranks among the most serious effects of human activities on the Earth’s environment.”

Read more at: https://phys.org/news/2018-01-broadest-view-world-oxygen-scientists.html#jCp

See also: https://billymeier.files.wordpress.com/2015/11/destruction-of-the-environment-as-the-consequence-of-overpopulation.pdf

See also: https://gregdougall.wordpress.com/2017/05/01/90-percent-of-the-worlds-fisheries-facing-collapse/

Sea-level rise predicted to threaten >13,000 archaeological sites in southeastern US

November 30, 2017

3-sealevelrise

Sea-level rise may impact vast numbers of archaeological and historic sites, cemeteries, and landscapes on the Atlantic and Gulf coasts of the southeastern United States, according to a study published November 29, 2017 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by David Anderson from the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, USA, and colleagues.

To estimate the impact of sea-level rise on archaeological sites, the authors of the present study analyzed data from the Digital Index of North American Archaeology (DINAA). DINAA aggregates archaeological and historical data sets developed over the past century from numerous sources, providing the public and research communities with a uniquely comprehensive window into human settlement.

Just in the remainder of this century, if projected trends in sea-level rise continue, the researchers predict that over 13,000 recorded archaeological sites in the southeast alone may be submerged with a 1 m rise in sea-level, including over 1,000 listed on the National Register of Historic Places as important cultural properties. Many more sites and structures that have not yet been recorded will also be lost.

Read more at: https://phys.org/news/2017-11-sea-level-threaten-archaeological-sites-southeastern.html#jCp

See also:  NASA finds Virginia metro area is sinking unevenly

See also:  https://billymeier.wordpress.com/2014/08/27/climate-change-due-to-overpopulation-some-seas-to-rise-more-than-5-feet-by-2100/

Most remote island in the world is also the most polluted with 17 tons of plastic

May 16, 2017

 

The beaches of one of the world’s most remote islands have been found to be polluted with the highest density of plastic debris reported anywhere on the planet, in a study published in the prestigious US scientific journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

Despite being uninhabited and located more than 5000 kilometres from the nearest major population centre, Henderson Island is littered with an estimated 37.7 million pieces of plastic.

Part of the UK’s Pitcairn Islands territory, the island is so remote that it’s only visited every five to ten years for research purposes, but its location near the centre of the South Pacific Gyre ocean current makes it a focal point for debris carried from South America or deposited by fishing boats.

During the most recent scientific expedition to the island led by the British nature conservation charity RSPB, the study’s lead author, IMAS researcher Dr Jennifer Lavers, found the beaches littered by up to 671 items per square metre, the highest density ever recorded.

“What’s happened on Henderson Island shows there’s no escaping plastic pollution even in the most distant parts of our oceans,” Dr Lavers said.

“Far from being the pristine ‘deserted island’ that people might imagine of such a remote place, Henderson Island is a shocking but typical example of how plastic debris is affecting the environment on a global scale.

“Based on our sampling at five sites we estimated that more than 17 tonnes of plastic debris has been deposited on the island, with more than 3570 new pieces of litter washing up each day on one beach alone.

“It’s likely that our data actually underestimates the true amount of debris on Henderson Island as we were only able to sample pieces bigger than two millimetres down to a depth of 10 centimetres, and we were unable to sample along cliffs and rocky coastline.”

Dr Lavers said most of the more than 300 million tonnes of plastic produced worldwide each year is not recycled, and as it’s buoyant and durable it has a long-term impact on the ocean.

“Plastic debris is an entanglement and ingestion hazard for many species, creates a physical barrier on beaches to animals such as sea turtles, and lowers the diversity of shoreline invertebrates.

“Research has shown that more than 200 species are known to be at risk from eating plastic, and 55 per cent of the world’s seabirds, including two species found on Henderson Island, are at risk from marine debris,” Dr Lavers said.

Read more at: https://phys.org/news/2017-05-ocean-plastic-million-bits-litter.html#jCp


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