Posts Tagged ‘pollution’

Are Pacific Garbage Patches Natural or Man Made?

January 22, 2019

What do you call something that isn’t climate change or global warming?

Destruction Of The Environment As The Consequence Of Overpopulation.

pacific garbage patches b6a652169

This weeks Nature News

September 30, 2018

https://phys.org/news/2018-09-pcb-pollution-threatens-killer-whales.html

https://phys.org/news/2018-09-microplastics-overlooked-river-ecosystems-percent.html

https://phys.org/news/2018-09-biofuels-green-space-climate-action.html

https://phys.org/news/2018-09-climate-disease-impacts.html

https://phys.org/news/2018-09-path-chemicals-soil.html

https://phys.org/news/2018-09-boosted-major-hurricane-tally.html

https://phys.org/news/2018-09-economic-policymakers-willingness-climate-efforts.html

https://phys.org/news/2018-09-arctic-summertime-sea-ice-minimum.html

OK, so I got lazy and didn’t include a few sentences for each study.  But you can figure it out.  None of it is good news.  Everything leads back to this: humans are destroying the environment as the consequence of overpopulation, and anyone who says otherwise is either lying or an idiot or both.

 

 

Watch the Water

April 10, 2018

“A large part of the freshwater ecosystems is potentially endangered by the high concentration of pharmaceuticals,”

A large number of drugs found in the environment—analgesics, antibiotics, anti-platelet agents, hormones, psychiatric drugs, anti-histamines—have been detected in nature at levels dangerous for wildlife.

Endocrine disruptors, for examples, have notoriously induced sex changes in fish and amphibians.

In other research presented at the conference, scientists found that the rapid expansion of sewage systems in large urban areas has sharply increased river pollution, because much of the effluence is not adequately treated.

“In 2000, sewage was a source of pollution in about 50 percent of the rivers in the world,” said Maryna Strokal, a scientist at Wageningen University & Research, in the Netherlands.

“By 2010, sewage was a source of pollution in almost all rivers worldwide.”

Antibiotics and chemicals waste is also driving the evolution of drug-resistant bacteria, UN Environment warned in a study in December.

Between 70 and 80 percent of all antibiotics consumed by humans and farm animals—totalling thousands of tonnes—find their way into natural environments, the UN agency said in a report.

Read more at: https://phys.org/news/2018-04-rivers-worldwide-threatened-pharma.html#jCp

Damn Dams risk fish extinction in U.S.

February 9, 2018

Dams drive local extinction risk of native fish in the southern United States, according to a study by Florida International University.

The high number of dams built close to each other in the southeast significantly limits where fish can move throughout their lives, driving the risk of extinction for native fish in some areas, according to a study led by FIU ecologist John Kominoski. In the southwest, dams and climate change interact to drive the risk of native fish extinction in some areas. …The restriction of water flows in rivers and streams is proving to be a real problem for fish.

The southern U.S. has experienced unprecedented population growth driving up water demands.

Read more at: https://phys.org/news/2018-02-fish-extinction.html#jCp

See also: https://gregdougall.wordpress.com/2017/05/01/90-percent-of-the-worlds-fisheries-facing-collapse/

https://gregdougall.wordpress.com/2018/01/13/salmon-and-orcas-sick-of-man-made-pesticides/

https://gregdougall.wordpress.com/2018/01/05/areas-of-no-oxygen-in-ocean-waters/

https://gregdougall.wordpress.com/2017/05/16/most-remote-island-in-the-world-is-also-the-most-polluted-with-17-tons-of-plastic/

https://billymeier.files.wordpress.com/2015/11/destruction-of-the-environment-as-the-consequence-of-overpopulation.pdf

 

 

Salmon and Orcas sick of Man Made Pesticides

January 13, 2018

US review shows pesticides harm threatened salmon, whales

Federal scientists have determined that a family of widely used pesticides poses a threat to dozens of endangered and threatened species, including Pacific salmon, Atlantic sturgeon and Puget Sound orcas.

The National Marine Fisheries Service issued its new biological opinion on three organophosphate pesticides—chlorpyrifos, diazinon and malathion—after a yearslong court fight by environmental groups. At the urging of pesticide manufacturers, the Trump administration had sought a two-year delay of a court-ordered deadline to issue the findings by the end of 2017, but it was unsuccessful.

The exhaustive 3,700-page federal review , dated Dec. 29, concludes that chlorpyrifos and malathion jeopardize 38 out of the 77 species under the jurisdiction of the fisheries service and that diazinon was found to jeopardize 25 of the listed species.

Organophosphorus gas was originally developed as a chemical weapon before World War II. Dow Chemical, based in Midland, Michigan, has been selling chlorpyrifos for spraying on citrus fruits, apples, cherries and other crops since the 1960s. It is among the most widely used agricultural pesticides in the United States, with Dow selling about 5 million pounds (2.3 million kilograms) domestically each year.

Studies have shown for years that even low levels of pesticides running off into streams and rivers can impair the growth, swimming ability and reproductive systems of salmon. Potentially harmful levels of the toxins then build up in the bodies of orcas, also known as killer whales, that eat salmon.

orca salmon

“Salmon have been waiting four decades for relief from toxic pesticides in many of our rivers,” said Glen Spain, the northwest regional director of the Pacific Coast Federation of Fishermen’s Associations. “The agencies should do their job.”

Read more at: https://phys.org/news/2018-01-pesticides-threatened-salmon-whales.html#jCp

Areas of No Oxygen in Ocean Waters

January 5, 2018

In the past 50 years, the amount of water in the open ocean with zero oxygen has gone up more than fourfold. In coastal water bodies, including estuaries and seas, low-oxygen sites have increased more than 10-fold since 1950. Scientists expect oxygen to continue dropping even outside these zones as Earth warms.

“Oxygen is fundamental to life in the oceans,” said Denise Breitburg, lead author and marine ecologist with the Smithsonian Environmental Research Center. “The decline in ocean oxygen ranks among the most serious effects of human activities on the Earth’s environment.”

Read more at: https://phys.org/news/2018-01-broadest-view-world-oxygen-scientists.html#jCp

See also: https://billymeier.files.wordpress.com/2015/11/destruction-of-the-environment-as-the-consequence-of-overpopulation.pdf

See also: https://gregdougall.wordpress.com/2017/05/01/90-percent-of-the-worlds-fisheries-facing-collapse/

Big Eco News Headlines September 2017

September 10, 2017

Unprecedented levels of nitrogen pose risks to Earth’s environment

Human production of this is now five times higher than it was 60 years ago. This increase could pose as much of a danger to Earth’s environment as the rapid increase in climate-warming atmospheric carbon dioxide, the scientists say.

Read more at: https://phys.org/news/2017-09-unprecedented-nitrogen-pose-earth-environment.html#jCp

China looks at ending sales of gasoline cars

China is joining France and Britain in announcing plans to end sales of gasoline and diesel cars.

China’s industry ministry is developing a timetable to end production and sale of traditional fuel cars and will promote development of electric technology, state media on Sunday cited a Cabinet official as saying.

Read more at: https://phys.org/news/2017-09-china-sales-gasoline-cars.html#jCp

Heat stress escalates in cities under global warming

Heatwaves are intensifying in cities due to the double whammy of the urban heat island effect and global warming, according to a new study.

The study’s authors used computer models to simulate with unprecedented detail the changes through the mid-21st century in Belgian cities. They found that heatwaves become hotter, longer and more frequent because of , and that temperature above the stress alarm level increases by a factor of between 1.4 and 15 by the middle of this century.

Read more at: https://phys.org/news/2017-09-stress-escalates-cities-global.html#jCp

Ship exhaust makes oceanic thunderstorms more intense

Thunderstorms directly above two of the world’s busiest shipping lanes are significantly more powerful than storms in areas of the ocean where ships don’t travel, according to new research.

A new study mapping lightning around the globe finds occur nearly twice as often directly above heavily-trafficked shipping lanes in the Indian Ocean and the South China Sea than they do in areas of the adjacent to that have similar climates.

The difference in lightning activity can’t be explained by changes in the weather, according to the study’s authors, who conclude that aerosol particles emitted in ship exhaust are changing how storm form over the ocean.

Read more at: https://phys.org/news/2017-09-ship-exhaust-oceanic-thunderstorms-intense.html#jCp

So what is the cause of all of this?  Humans!

Get the conclusive and comprehensive report here:

https://billymeier.files.wordpress.com/2015/11/destruction-of-the-environment-as-the-consequence-of-overpopulation.pdf

Update:

UK wind electricity cheaper than nuclear

The price of electricity from offshore wind in Britain has dipped below the level guaranteed to Hinkley Point, raising questions about the construction of the vast nuclear power station.   The price of offshore wind has fallen far below that of nuclear…

Read more at: https://phys.org/news/2017-09-uk-electricity-cheaper-nuclear.html#jCp

 

Most remote island in the world is also the most polluted with 17 tons of plastic

May 16, 2017

 

The beaches of one of the world’s most remote islands have been found to be polluted with the highest density of plastic debris reported anywhere on the planet, in a study published in the prestigious US scientific journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

Despite being uninhabited and located more than 5000 kilometres from the nearest major population centre, Henderson Island is littered with an estimated 37.7 million pieces of plastic.

Part of the UK’s Pitcairn Islands territory, the island is so remote that it’s only visited every five to ten years for research purposes, but its location near the centre of the South Pacific Gyre ocean current makes it a focal point for debris carried from South America or deposited by fishing boats.

During the most recent scientific expedition to the island led by the British nature conservation charity RSPB, the study’s lead author, IMAS researcher Dr Jennifer Lavers, found the beaches littered by up to 671 items per square metre, the highest density ever recorded.

“What’s happened on Henderson Island shows there’s no escaping plastic pollution even in the most distant parts of our oceans,” Dr Lavers said.

“Far from being the pristine ‘deserted island’ that people might imagine of such a remote place, Henderson Island is a shocking but typical example of how plastic debris is affecting the environment on a global scale.

“Based on our sampling at five sites we estimated that more than 17 tonnes of plastic debris has been deposited on the island, with more than 3570 new pieces of litter washing up each day on one beach alone.

“It’s likely that our data actually underestimates the true amount of debris on Henderson Island as we were only able to sample pieces bigger than two millimetres down to a depth of 10 centimetres, and we were unable to sample along cliffs and rocky coastline.”

Dr Lavers said most of the more than 300 million tonnes of plastic produced worldwide each year is not recycled, and as it’s buoyant and durable it has a long-term impact on the ocean.

“Plastic debris is an entanglement and ingestion hazard for many species, creates a physical barrier on beaches to animals such as sea turtles, and lowers the diversity of shoreline invertebrates.

“Research has shown that more than 200 species are known to be at risk from eating plastic, and 55 per cent of the world’s seabirds, including two species found on Henderson Island, are at risk from marine debris,” Dr Lavers said.

Read more at: https://phys.org/news/2017-05-ocean-plastic-million-bits-litter.html#jCp

A Year in the Life of CO2 video

June 16, 2016

 

See related Articles:

http://www.scientificamerican.com/article/antarctic-co2-hit-400-ppm-for-first-time-in-4-million-years/

https://billymeier.wordpress.com/2015/06/03/excess-co2-leads-to-oxygen-collapse/

80 Percent of City Dwellers Breathe Bad Air

May 12, 2016

Over 80 percent of the world’s city dwellers breathe poor quality air, increasing their risk of lung cancer and other life-threatening diseases, a new World Health Organization (WHO) report warned Thursday.

Urban residents in poor countries are by far the worst affected, WHO said, noting that nearly every city (98 percent) in low- and middle-income countries has air which fails to meet the UN body’s standards.

City vs. Country: Which Is Safer?

You’d think peaceful country living would do wonders for your health. No pollution, less violence. Seems like the obvious way to go, right? But it isn’t so cut and dry.

That number falls to 56 percent of cities in wealthier countries.

Cutting CO2 Could Prevent 175,000 US Deaths

“Urban air pollution continues to rise at an alarming rate, wreaking havoc on human health,” Maria Neira, the head of WHO’s department of public health and environment, said in a statement.

The UN agency’s latest air pollution database reveals an overall deterioration of air in the planet’s cities, and highlights the growing risk of serious health conditions also including stroke and asthma.

The report, which focused on outdoor rather than household air, compared data collected from 795 cities in 67 countries between 2008 and 2013.

The Colorado River in the Grand Canyon in Arizona faces a host of threats including radioactive pollution from uranium mining, proposed construction projects and increased groundwater pumping that could deplete freshwater supplies, according to the group.

Tracking the prevalence of harmful pollutants like sulfate and black carbon, WHO found that air quality was generally improving in richer regions like Europe and North America, but worsening in developing regions, notably the Middle East and southeast Asia.

Overall, contaminants in outdoor air caused more than 3 million premature deaths a year, the UN body said.

The quality of air pollution data provided by individual countries varies considerably, and WHO does not compile a ranking of the world’s most polluted cities.

But, in a sample of selected mega-cities with a population above 14 million, New Delhi was the most polluted, followed by Cairo and Bangladesh’s capital Dhaka.

Crucially, key African centers like Nigeria’s mega-city Lagos were excluded from the list because of the sparse availability of air quality data in many parts of the continent, WHO said.

A sample of European data showed that Rome had slightly worse air than Berlin, followed by London and Madrid.

Key factors 

Carlos Dora, coordinator at WHO’s public health and environment department, pointed to several key factors that determine the quality of a city’s air.

First was transportation, Dora said, noting that cities which succeed in reducing vehicle traffic while promoting walking, cycling and mass public transport inevitably see their air quality improve.

Energy inefficiency — especially with respect to heating and cooling buildings — is a major cause of dirty air, along with the widespread use of diesel generators as a replacement for cleaner electricity sources, Dora added.

Another crucial factor, especially in developing countries, is waste management, with the smoke generated by burning garbage ranking among the top pollutants.

Source: http://news.discovery.com/earth/global-warming/80-percent-of-city-dwellers-breathe-bad-air-un-160512.htm

 


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