Posts Tagged ‘water’

Are Pacific Garbage Patches Natural or Man Made?

January 22, 2019

What do you call something that isn’t climate change or global warming?

Destruction Of The Environment As The Consequence Of Overpopulation.

pacific garbage patches b6a652169

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Plankton decline in Atlantic Ocean

December 27, 2018

Pierre Pepin, a senior researcher with the Department of Fisheries and Oceans in St. John’s, says over the past three to four years, scientists have seen a persistent drop in phytoplankton and zooplankton in waters off Newfoundland and Labrador.

“Based on the measurements that we’ve been taking in this region, we’ve seen pretty close to 50 per cent decline in the overall biomass of zooplankton,” said Pepin. “So that’s pretty dramatic.”

Measuring five millimetres or less, phytoplankton contain chlorophyll to capture sunlight and use photosynthesis to turn it into chemical energy, which is later eaten by ocean creatures. (Photo courtesy of DFO)

Scientists say local testing reveals half the amount of plankton in a square metre of water today. It’s not just a problem here, declining plankton numbers are a global phenomenon.

It’s a difficult idea to convey to the average person who might not understand the ocean ecosystem, but Pepin likens it to walking into a grocery store and instead of seeing the shelves full, they’re only half-full.

Full article:

https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/newfoundland-labrador/ocean-phytoplankton-zooplankton-food-web-1.4927884

Thanks to: Joseph Borg

 

90.5 percent of plastic is not recycled

December 18, 2018
Scary statistic: 90.5 percent of plastic is not recycled

This Saturday, Dec. 8, 2018 photo piles of electronic waste is placed next to a drain chocked with plastic and garbage in New Delhi, India. (AP Photo/Altaf Qadri)

The world’s burgeoning plastic waste crisis has won the attention of Britain’s Royal Statistical Society, which chose 90.5 percent—the proportion of plastic waste that has never been recycled—as its international statistic of the year.

The society, which chooses a winner from nominations made by the public, picked the statistic generated in a U.N. report based on the work of U.S. academics Roland Geyer, Jenna R Jambeck and Kara Lavender Law.

Public awareness of the problem has been growing, particularly after filmmaker David Attenborough’s documentary “Blue Planet II” showed sea turtles shrouded in plastic, among other horrors.

Geyer says he was honored by the accolade and hopes “it will help draw attention to the problem of plastic pollution that impacts nearly every community and ecosystem globally.”

Read more at: https://phys.org/news/2018-12-scary-statistic-percent-plastic-recycled.html#jCp

Related: DOTEATCOO
https://gregdougall.wordpress.com/2017/05/16/most-remote-island-in-the-world-is-also-the-most-polluted-with-17-tons-of-plastic/
https://gregdougall.wordpress.com/2018/06/03/through-the-fault-of-humans/

Sun power makes steam

December 11, 2018

Full steam ahead

The researchers first tested the structure by running experiments in the lab, using a solar simulator that mimics the characteristics of natural sunlight at varying, controlled intensities. They found that the structure was able to heat a small basin of water to the boiling point and produce superheated steam, at 122 C, under conditions that simulated the sunlight produced on a clear, sunny day. When the researchers increased this solar intensity by 1.7 times, they found the device produced even hotter steam, at 144 C.

On Oct. 21, 2017, they tested the device on the roof of MIT’s Building 1, under ambient conditions. The day was clear and bright, and to increase the sun’s intensity further, the researchers constructed a simple solar concentrator—a curved mirror that helps to collect and redirect more sunlight onto the device, thus raising the incoming solar flux, similar to the way a magnifying glass can be used to concentrate a sun’s beam to up a patch of pavement.

sunsoakingde
Photograph of the contactless solar evaporation structure operating on the roof of MIT in October 2017. A non-tracking solar concentrator allows steam temperatures as high as 146 °C to be achieved even in autumn months.

With this added shielding, the structure produced steam in excess of 146 C over the course of 3.5 hours. In subsequent experiments, the team was able to produce steam from sea water, without contaminating the surface of the device with salt crystals. In another set of experiments, they were also able to collect and condense the steam in a flask to produce pure, distilled water.

Chen says that, in addition to overcoming the challenges of contamination, the ‘s design enables steam to be collected at a single point, in a concentrated stream, whereas previous designs produced more dilute spray.

“This design really solves the fouling problem and the steam collection problem,” Chen says. “Now we’re looking to make this more efficient and improve the system. There are different opportunities, and we’re looking at what are the best options to pursue.”

source: https://techxplore.com/news/2018-12-sun-soaking-device-superheated-steam.html

Scientists prove what Billy Meier warned about decades ago

October 8, 2018

“Think of the land as a sponge,” Maranger said. “After a while, sponges that absorb too much water will leak. In the case of phosphorus, the landscape absorbs it year after year after year, and after a while, its retention capacity is reduced. At that point historical phosphorus inputs contribute more to what reaches our water.”

Until now, no-one had been able to put a number to the amount of accumulated phosphorus at the watershed scale that’s needed to reach a tipping point in terms of accelerating the amount of the mineral flowing into the aquatic ecosystem.

waterstream

‘Really important contribution’

“This is a very important finding,” Bennett said. “It takes our farm-scale knowledge of fertilizers and pollution and scales it up to understand how whole watersheds respond within a historical context.”

Agriculture on a mass scale began in Quebec only in the 1950s, but some of the province’s more historical agricultural watersheds had already passed the tipping point by the 1920s, the study found.

Even if phosphorus inputs ceased immediately, eliminating the accumulated phosphorus in saturated Quebec watersheds would take between 100 and 2,000 years, the researchers estimate.

In some countries, including China, Canada, and the US, phosphorus is so heavily used now that the saturation point is reached in as little as five years.
Read more at: https://phys.org/news/2018-10-yesterday-agriculture-today-pollution.html#jCp

Read Meier’s warnings about fertilizer runoff here:

https://billymeier.files.wordpress.com/2015/11/destruction-of-the-environment-as-the-consequence-of-overpopulation.pdf

See also:

https://gregdougall.wordpress.com/2018/06/19/small-farm-chemicals/

https://gregdougall.wordpress.com/2018/04/10/watch-the-water/

“Watch the water”

https://gregdougall.wordpress.com/2018/02/09/damn-dams-risk-fish-extinction-in-u-s/

https://gregdougall.wordpress.com/2017/05/01/90-percent-of-the-worlds-fisheries-facing-collapse/

https://gregdougall.wordpress.com/2018/01/13/salmon-and-orcas-sick-of-man-made-pesticides/

https://gregdougall.wordpress.com/2018/01/05/areas-of-no-oxygen-in-ocean-waters/

https://gregdougall.wordpress.com/2017/05/16/most-remote-island-in-the-world-is-also-the-most-polluted-with-17-tons-of-plastic/

 

 

 

What’s going on in the world- May 2018

May 3, 2018

 Amazon river dolphins in steep decline

Two kinds of river dolphins are dying off fast in the Amazon region, and may face extinction unless they are more vigorously protected against fishing, researchers in Brazil said Wednesday.

 

Climate change will boost global lake evaporation—with ‘extreme’ consequences

Global lake evaporation will increase 16 percent by the end of the century as a consequence of climate change, a new Yale study finds. But the specific mechanisms that will drive that phenomenon are not quite what scientists …

 

Weather forecast model predicts complex patterns of volcanic ash dispersal

New research, led by the University of Bristol, has provided fresh insight into how huge volcanic ash plumes, which can critically disrupt aviation and cause major impact on the ground, are transported in the atmosphere.

 

Most microplastic harm done at lowest levels of food web, according to analysis

Purdue University scientists led a comprehensive analysis of research concerning the effects of microplastics on aquatic life, with the results showing widely different impacts among different types of animals. Strong negative effects were particularly apparent for small animals, such as larval fish and zooplankton, a source of food for many species, suggesting serious potential consequences that could ripple throughout the food web.
Flaw found in water treatment method—Process may unwittingly generate harmful chemicals

Public water quality has received a lot of attention in recent years as some disturbing discoveries have been made regarding lead levels in cities across the country. Now, a new study from the Johns Hopkins University pinpoints …

 

Read more at: https://phys.org/

Real news. Watch the water.

#REALNEWS

science, nature, reality, earth, facts, environment, climate

See also: https://billymeier.files.wordpress.com/2015/11/destruction-of-the-environment-as-the-consequence-of-overpopulation.pdf

for the definitive document on what is happening and will happen to this planet.

 

Watch the Water

April 10, 2018

“A large part of the freshwater ecosystems is potentially endangered by the high concentration of pharmaceuticals,”

A large number of drugs found in the environment—analgesics, antibiotics, anti-platelet agents, hormones, psychiatric drugs, anti-histamines—have been detected in nature at levels dangerous for wildlife.

Endocrine disruptors, for examples, have notoriously induced sex changes in fish and amphibians.

In other research presented at the conference, scientists found that the rapid expansion of sewage systems in large urban areas has sharply increased river pollution, because much of the effluence is not adequately treated.

“In 2000, sewage was a source of pollution in about 50 percent of the rivers in the world,” said Maryna Strokal, a scientist at Wageningen University & Research, in the Netherlands.

“By 2010, sewage was a source of pollution in almost all rivers worldwide.”

Antibiotics and chemicals waste is also driving the evolution of drug-resistant bacteria, UN Environment warned in a study in December.

Between 70 and 80 percent of all antibiotics consumed by humans and farm animals—totalling thousands of tonnes—find their way into natural environments, the UN agency said in a report.

Read more at: https://phys.org/news/2018-04-rivers-worldwide-threatened-pharma.html#jCp

Damn Dams risk fish extinction in U.S.

February 9, 2018

Dams drive local extinction risk of native fish in the southern United States, according to a study by Florida International University.

The high number of dams built close to each other in the southeast significantly limits where fish can move throughout their lives, driving the risk of extinction for native fish in some areas, according to a study led by FIU ecologist John Kominoski. In the southwest, dams and climate change interact to drive the risk of native fish extinction in some areas. …The restriction of water flows in rivers and streams is proving to be a real problem for fish.

The southern U.S. has experienced unprecedented population growth driving up water demands.

Read more at: https://phys.org/news/2018-02-fish-extinction.html#jCp

See also: https://gregdougall.wordpress.com/2017/05/01/90-percent-of-the-worlds-fisheries-facing-collapse/

https://gregdougall.wordpress.com/2018/01/13/salmon-and-orcas-sick-of-man-made-pesticides/

https://gregdougall.wordpress.com/2018/01/05/areas-of-no-oxygen-in-ocean-waters/

https://gregdougall.wordpress.com/2017/05/16/most-remote-island-in-the-world-is-also-the-most-polluted-with-17-tons-of-plastic/

https://billymeier.files.wordpress.com/2015/11/destruction-of-the-environment-as-the-consequence-of-overpopulation.pdf

 

 

Areas of No Oxygen in Ocean Waters

January 5, 2018

In the past 50 years, the amount of water in the open ocean with zero oxygen has gone up more than fourfold. In coastal water bodies, including estuaries and seas, low-oxygen sites have increased more than 10-fold since 1950. Scientists expect oxygen to continue dropping even outside these zones as Earth warms.

“Oxygen is fundamental to life in the oceans,” said Denise Breitburg, lead author and marine ecologist with the Smithsonian Environmental Research Center. “The decline in ocean oxygen ranks among the most serious effects of human activities on the Earth’s environment.”

Read more at: https://phys.org/news/2018-01-broadest-view-world-oxygen-scientists.html#jCp

See also: https://billymeier.files.wordpress.com/2015/11/destruction-of-the-environment-as-the-consequence-of-overpopulation.pdf

See also: https://gregdougall.wordpress.com/2017/05/01/90-percent-of-the-worlds-fisheries-facing-collapse/

Sea-level rise predicted to threaten >13,000 archaeological sites in southeastern US

November 30, 2017

3-sealevelrise

Sea-level rise may impact vast numbers of archaeological and historic sites, cemeteries, and landscapes on the Atlantic and Gulf coasts of the southeastern United States, according to a study published November 29, 2017 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by David Anderson from the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, USA, and colleagues.

To estimate the impact of sea-level rise on archaeological sites, the authors of the present study analyzed data from the Digital Index of North American Archaeology (DINAA). DINAA aggregates archaeological and historical data sets developed over the past century from numerous sources, providing the public and research communities with a uniquely comprehensive window into human settlement.

Just in the remainder of this century, if projected trends in sea-level rise continue, the researchers predict that over 13,000 recorded archaeological sites in the southeast alone may be submerged with a 1 m rise in sea-level, including over 1,000 listed on the National Register of Historic Places as important cultural properties. Many more sites and structures that have not yet been recorded will also be lost.

Read more at: https://phys.org/news/2017-11-sea-level-threaten-archaeological-sites-southeastern.html#jCp

See also:  NASA finds Virginia metro area is sinking unevenly

See also:  https://billymeier.wordpress.com/2014/08/27/climate-change-due-to-overpopulation-some-seas-to-rise-more-than-5-feet-by-2100/